Chinese

Encoding and Decoding of Emotional Speech: A Cross-Cultural by Aijun Li

By Aijun Li

​This e-book addresses the topic of emotional speech, specifically its encoding and interpreting approach in the course of interactive verbal exchange, according to a far better model of Brunswik’s Lens version. the method is proven to be motivated through the speaker’s and the listener’s linguistic and cultural backgrounds, in addition to by means of the transmission channels used. via either psycholinguistic and phonetic research of emotional multimodality info for 2 typologically diversified languages, i.e., chinese language and jap, the publication demonstrates and elucidates the mutual and differing interpreting and encoding schemes of emotional speech in chinese language and Japanese.

Show description

Read Online or Download Encoding and Decoding of Emotional Speech: A Cross-Cultural and Multimodal Study between Chinese and Japanese PDF

Best chinese books

The Garlic Ballads: A Novel

WINNER OF THE 2012 NOBEL PRIZE IN LITERATUREThe farmers of Paradise County were top a hardscrabble lifestyles unchanged for generations. The Communist govt has inspired them to plant garlic, yet promoting the crop isn't really so simple as they believed. Warehouses refill, taxes skyrocket, and executive officers maltreat even those that have traveled for days to promote their harvest.

Gao Xingjian's idea of theatre: from the word to the image

This ebook argues that Gao Xingjian's suggestion of Theatre can purely be defined through his vast wisdom and use of varied chinese language and Western theatrical, literary, inventive and philosophical traditions. the writer goals to teach how Gao's theories of the theatre of anti-illusion, theatre of wide awake conference, of the "poor theatre" and overall theatre, of the impartial actor and the actor - jester - storyteller are derived from the a ways japanese culture, and to what volume they've been encouraged by means of twentieth century Euro-American reformers of theatre resembling Antonin Artaud, Bertolt Brecht, Vsevol.

Encoding and Decoding of Emotional Speech: A Cross-Cultural and Multimodal Study between Chinese and Japanese

​This e-book addresses the topic of emotional speech, specially its encoding and interpreting procedure in the course of interactive communique, in line with a better model of Brunswik’s Lens version. the method is proven to be motivated via the speaker’s and the listener’s linguistic and cultural backgrounds, in addition to by way of the transmission channels used.

Extra info for Encoding and Decoding of Emotional Speech: A Cross-Cultural and Multimodal Study between Chinese and Japanese

Sample text

They found that subjects obtained high recognition scores in the first gate after only 160 ms (160–480 ms seemed to be sufficient for classifying a film clip of a speaker in a positive state). The recognition speed is faster for positive than negative emotions. Audibert et al. (2007) suggested that the recognition speed varied across emotions. For example, he found that the expressions of satisfaction presented distinct gradient values that make an early identification of affective values possible.

As for the emotional intonation, the overall intonational pattern is one of the correlates of emotional modes. 1, it usually includes pitch average and pitch range. However, the perturbations in fundamental frequency appear to be an acoustic correlate of the emotional modes (Lieberman and Michaels 1962), including F0 jitter (Wang et al. 2006b), shimmer, and boundary tone cues. Boundary tone is one of the components of intonation which we will focus on. Its function is to convey linguistic and paralinguistic meanings.

Abelin and Allwood (2000) indicated that the interpretation of emotions by listeners with different mother tongues depended on the intended emotions. Specifically, anger, fear, sadness, and surprise were interpreted as intended emotion in a greater degree in comparison with shyness, dominance, happiness, and disgust for listeners with different native languages. In a recent work given by Sauter et al. (2010), they examined the recognition of nonverbal emotional vocalizations, such as screams and laughs, across two dramatically different cultural groups.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.30 of 5 – based on 35 votes