Civics Citizenship

Crossing Borders: Migration and Citizenship in the by Dorothee Schneider

By Dorothee Schneider

Aspiring immigrants to the USA make many separate border crossings of their quest to develop into Americans—in their domestic cities, ports of departure, U.S. border stations, and in American neighborhoods, courthouses, and colleges. In a booklet of outstanding breadth, Dorothee Schneider covers either the immigrants’ event in their passage from an previous society to a brand new one and American policymakers’ debates over admission to the us and citizenship. Bringing jointly the separate histories of Irish, English, German, Italian, Jewish, chinese language, eastern, and Mexican immigrants, the publication opens up a clean view of immigrant aspirations and govt responses.Ingenuity and braveness emerge again and again from those tales, as immigrants tailored their specific assets, particularly social networks, to make migration and citizenship profitable all alone phrases. whereas officers argued over immigrants’ health for admission and citizenship, immigrant groups compelled the govt. to change the that means of race, type, and gender as standards for admission. girls specifically made a protracted transition from dependence on males to shapers in their personal destinies.Schneider goals to narrate the immigrant adventure as a totality throughout many borders. through together with immigrant voices in addition to U.S. rules and legislation, she offers a really transnational heritage that provides helpful views on present debates over immigration. (20110810)

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Crossing Borders: Migration and Citizenship in the Twentieth-Century United States

Aspiring immigrants to the U.S. make many separate border crossings of their quest to develop into Americans—in their domestic cities, ports of departure, U. S. border stations, and in American neighborhoods, courthouses, and colleges. In a booklet of outstanding breadth, Dorothee Schneider covers either the immigrants’ event in their passage from an previous society to a brand new one and American policymakers’ debates over admission to the U.S. and citizenship.

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Extra info for Crossing Borders: Migration and Citizenship in the Twentieth-Century United States

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By the early twentieth century, emigration had become a strategy linked to a planned return for many Europeans. S. immigrants or temporary migrants, the new migration was also not altogether welcome. 48 But in contrast to the case of Asian immigration in which American officials moved unilaterally to exclude all newcomers from China and Japan, when it came to Eu ropeans, American officials hesitated to make such a move; instead, they introduced laws or administrative practices that, in effect, moved American border controls to Europe.

75 Because emigrants from Russia labored under the double handicaps of poverty and official disapproval of emigration, and because of the distance to ports of departure, organizing the exit was a formidable task. A passport, necessary for legal exit, was expensive. It cost eighteen rubles, reported Inspector Cowan, a large sum for a workingclass family. Alternatively, would-be migrants could apply for an emigrant passport, which did not allow for return— this was risky, because it rendered those deported or not admitted to the United States effectively stateless.

56 What was it like in America? Did they need more workingmen there? Was there really more respect for the working class? “We all like America, it gives us cheer to think about it! 57 Migration and the desire to leave was everywhere. The continent teemed with people who were about to leave, wanted to leave, or were living off those who had already left.  A. 59 And her colleague John Trenor was even more drastic: “emigration . . ”60 American inspectors found very little migration that could be termed artificial.

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